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2010.08.30

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Tex the Pontificator

I have a childhood memory that, while not as extreme, has nevertheless stuck with me. I grew up in a middle class home in South Texas. A great uncle farmed citrus and cotton in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. One day he took my two younger siblings and me out to a cotton field to pick a few bolls of cotton.

For us it was a lark, but he was really going to check on the progress of the harvest. I remember piling out of his air conditioned car and seeing men, women, and children picking cotton for real in the Texas sun. I don't know how old I was, but I was old enough to be embarrassed about how good I had it and how I had wanted to play at picking cotton.

Indy

Yes, but in Lagos, Nigeria the BBC tells us in a very cheery and upbeat voice, that the exact same situation is all part of the ultra-successful adaptation to extreme urban future - where nothing is wasted and everything is an opportunity - a model for us all - just "suffering through a few .. growing pains".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8llgvgHxHE

gus3

Concur completely. I was in Silicon Valley, holding out for a big opportunity within my company, when my mother got cancer. Shortly after her surgery, I packed up and went home to the Midwest.

Three weeks later, during follow-up chemo, Mom went into anaphalactic shock from the treatment. As I watched the oncology staff race to save her, I knew I had made the right choice.

Mom is doing fine today, and I treasure the time I spend with her and Dad.

No regrets here. I am blessed to have the opportunity to make this wise choice, rather than have my folly surprise me when it's too late to do anything about it.

BOB R

Gus3:

You know how lucky you are.

I'm in mid 60s. I got so busy being successful that I missed the last chance to tell a friend who died of liver cancer how much he meant to me, to love my Dad's only sister I never knew, to hug and old friend who died alone, and to make amends with a long, lost love who suffered a horrible cancer.

You made the best choice! God love you.

Classical Liberal

I remember once many years ago I was having what I considered to be a bad day and was in a lousy mood as I walked into a Fred Meyer store (a discount department and grocery store, kind of like a Target). Coming out was a man using crutches, with one of his legs off at the knee. Suddenly my supposed troubles seemed quite trivial.

On a completely different topic: Isaac, is this "Bollywood"? Do you speak that language, and if so, what are they saying? http://hotair.com/archives/2010/08/31/video-the-greatest-action-sequence-of-all-time/

[Technically, no it's not Bollywood. If it were, I would be able to understand what they're saying.

Well, I understood the first few words: maar saale ko. It means kill him.

Bollywood is the Bombay-based Hindi-language movie industry. The people in that clip are definitely not speaking Hindi. By checking the You Tube page of the clip, one finds out that they're speaking Telugu -- third most-spoken language in India.

-- Isaac S.]

PRB

I am a young guy (only 23) and I did well in college and got into Teach for America (which, for 2009, only about 12% of applicants were accepted). I was all set to move down to Mississippi. However, I quit five days into training-- I just felt like I had to go home. Because of my TFA acceptance, I had stopped the job search for awhile and when I came back home I was unemployed. During my "funemployment" I would spend a lot of mornings talking to my dad (who was fortunate enough to work at home when he was able). Little did I know that in December of 2009 he would get very sick and, after 7 weeks in the hospital, pass away. Being young and having no wisdom, I am happy now that I spent all the time I did with him when I might have been in Mississippi or even just working a 9-5 job. I am grateful that on one of the first nights I spent with him in the hospital, when he was in what might be called a living hell, I told him that I loved him and he, without hesitation, told me the same. A moment like that continues to make everything worthwhile.
PB

submandave

"Coming out was a man using crutches, with one of his legs off at the knee."

I was sad because I had no shoes, until I saw a man with no feet. So I took his shoes... I mean, he really didn't need them, did he?

(sorry to break the tone of a very serious thread, but I always liked that joke)

Oran Woody

Thank you for this bit. I immediately "cut and pasted" it into a message to my friends and associates.
I followed an Instapundit link, but I've bookmarked your site and will be back.
Thank again,

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